dialogue: A Midsummer Night's Dream

May 2017

 

    The wildwood, where Midsummer takes place, is an entity of its own. Here, CB Sherlock experiences fairies over and over again; Literary nonsense. The wildwood not only houses the fairies. The mechanicals camp. Lovers find shelter as they travel to Athens. Much happens under its boughs ---and the woods become image. 

    The forest is the set of the play---the trees abound. Dragonflies,  June beetles, butterflies and fireflies flit through the pages as the fairies flit through the play.

   More than just backdrop, the woodlands are alive and respond to the players that appear in each act through the multicolored relief print of layed leaves that precede them.  Large leaves represent the presence of fairies, medium leaves the lovers, and small leaves the mechanicals.  

    The trees are part of the whole book from imagery to binding to containers.        

    Dialogue of A Midsummer Night’s Dream is letterpress printed on a Vandercook No. 219 with Caslon Old Style metal type from H&M Foundry.  Double and single page illustrations printed in multiple colors from linoleum and polymer plates introduce each act of the play.

    The book’s binding is an open spine sewn over walnut ink dyed paper thread that encircles a tree branch collected from CB’s 2015 travels through Colorado, Montana, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Mary Hark paper, handmade from high quality flax and linen fibers, is used for the  covers. The standard edition is housed in a slipcase, while the deluxe is housed in a double tray box accompanied by a Woodland print. 

      The Woodland print is a 50 x 22 inch concertina constructed of eleven panels, each relief-printed with trees and fairies as insects that together form the magical landscape of the play.

     CB Sherlock’s hand can be seen in all aspects of this book: design, printing, imagery, binding, and boxmaking.

size 22" x 4.4
size 22" x 9"


Edition Size: 30 Books

Cost:

To purchase, please contact cbsherlock@yahoo.com.



Collections: 
Library of Congress, Minnesota Historical Society, University of Washington-Seattle,